The field of study Health and Welfare with Focus on Evidence-Based Practice concerns the work being done at both individual and societal levels to promote people's health and social well-being. It involves the development of knowledge, the summary and critical awareness of knowledge, the implementation of evidence-based knowledge, and the process evaluation of evidence-based practice.

The aim of the doctoral studies programme is to develop the competence of doctoral students so that they can build on the foundations for evidence-based knowledge and fill identified knowledge gaps. The research is primarily oriented towards the research conducted in our four research centres: Reproductive, Infant and Child Health (RICH), Ageing and Later Life (ReCALL), Knowledge Implementation and Patient Safety (KIPS), and Public Health and Sports (RePS). The degree awarded is in Health Sciences.

The focus of studies is on complex processes in health care and the welfare sector involving various perspectives on health. Health sciences is inter-disciplinary by nature, and grounded on knowledge and methods from several academic disciplines. Doctoral students in this field of study can have a range of professional backgrounds: for example, nurse, midwife, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, doctor, and social worker.

Evidence-based health and welfare practice involves the application of the best available scientific knowledge together with professional experience and an understanding of the individual client's situation, experience, and preferences so that care decisions can be reached. To meet the complex needs within the health and welfare sector, knowledge needs to be developed, assessed, and implemented to enhance health and prevent illness.

Doctoral Programme Objectives

Doctoral studies in this field aim to develop the ability and skills of doctoral students to build on the foundations for evidence-based knowledge through original studies; systematic literature searches; synthesis and critical review of identified scientific knowledge; the way in which evidence-based knowledge can be implemented in the health and welfare sector; and the way in which its applications can be evaluated. The programme will support doctoral students in such a way that they are able to apply scientific theory, design, methods, and analysis with consideration given to quantitative and qualitative aspects, research ethics, and scientific presentation and communication.

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Doctoral Courses

A doctoral degree comprises a course component of 45 credits, of which the following 30 credits are for compulsory courses:

  • General Principles of Scientific Work: Introductory Course, 7.5 Credits
  • Scientific Methods, 7.5 Credits
  • Systematic Review, Meta-Synthesis and Meta-Analysis, 7.5 Credits
  • Implementation Research in Health and Welfare Practice, 7.5 Credits

The licentiate degree comprises a course component of 30 credits, of which the following 20 credits are for compulsory courses:

  • General Principles of Scientific Work: Introductory Course, 7.5 Credits
  • Scientific Methods, 7.5 Credits
  • Systematic Review, Meta-Synthesis and Meta-Analysis, 5.0 Credits

Visit Courses at the Doctoral Level (webpage) for information on what courses we offer and how to apply.

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